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Spontaneous Generation and the Origin of Life - …

I. Introduction to Genetics
A. Identify important people and events in the history of genetics.
B. Define the main areas of genetics such as molecular genetics,
transmission genetics and population genetics.
II. Cellular Basis of Structure and Growth
A. Compare Prokaryotic Cells and Eukaryotic Cells.
B. Review reproductive and development processes.
1. Compare the processes and significance of mitosis and meiosis.
2. Define development: growth and differentiation.
III. Mendelian Genetics: Basic Principles of Inheritance
A. Discuss Mendel's research on pea plants.
1. Solve problems involving dominant and recessive traits using Punnett Squares.
2. Apply Mendel's Laws of Dominance, Segregation and Independent Assortment.
B. Apply basic probability concepts to solve genetics problems.
C. Solve problems involving multiple alleles to include human blood groups.
D. Solve problems involving polygenic inheritance.
E. Calculate gene frequencies using the Hardy-Weinberg Law.
IV. Human Genetics
A. Analyze pedigree diagrams.
1. Recognize pedigree symbols.
2. Calculate simple probabilities related to pedigree analysis.
3. Analyze autosomal pedigrees of recessive inheritance.
4. Analyze autsomal pedigrees of dominant inheritance.
5. Analyze pedigree of sex-linked traits.
B. Describe the outcomes of genetic counseling.
C. Use online and library resources related to human genetics.
V. Human Sexuality
A. Review the female reproductive system and make reproductive systems.
B. Compare spermatogenesis in the male with oogenesis in the female.
C. Compare development of male and female genotypes.
D. Describe genetic sexual disorders, including:
1. Single gene disorders, such as pseudohermaphroditism and testicular pominization and chromosomal disorders, such as
a. Turner's Syndrome
b. Klinefelter's Syndrome
c. XYY Males
VI. Reproductive Technologies and Choices
A. Describe birth technologies, such as:
1. Artificial insemination
2. Surrogate motherhood
3. In-Vitro fertilization
B. Describe prenatal diagnosis, including:
1. Amniocentesis
2. Chorionic Villus sampling
C. Compare different bioethical considerations related to new reproductive technologies and choices.
VII. Informational Macromolecules
A. Review the chemistry of amino acids, proteins and enzymes.
B. Describe and discuss DNA, and the following functions of genetic material:
1. Transformation
2. Transduction
3. Structure and replication of DNA
C. Describe RNA and protein synthesis to include:
1. Messenger and Transfer RNA
2. Protein synthesis
D. Illustrate the basic mechanisms of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
VIII. Variation
A. Discuss examples of genetic variation, including:
1. Dominance and recessiveness (Phenylketonuria)
2. Expressivity (Diabetes)
3. Penetrance (Polydactyly)
4. Delayed Onset (Huntington's Chorea)
5. Co-Dominance (Human Blood Groups)
6. Epistasis (Congenital Deafness)
B. Discuss examples of variation caused by environment.
IX. Mutations
A. Describe different chromosomal mutations, including:
1. Deletions
2. Duplications
3. Inversions
4. Translocations
5. Downs Syndrome
B. Describe types of gene mutations, including:
1. Point mutations
2. Frameshift mutations
3. Spontaneous mutations
4. Causes of mutations
C. Discuss the genetic basis of many cancers including the role of:
1. Oncogenes
2. Tumor suppressor genes
3. Chemical mutagens/carcinogens
4. Radiation and other environmental factors
X. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
A. Describe the main application areas of biotechnology in medicine, agriculture and other areas of society.
B. Describe basic techniques used in recombinant DNA.
C. Explain the basic principles behind the technologies involved in gene amplification and sequencing.
D. Discuss ethical considerations of new technologies.
XI. Laboratory and Research Skills
A. Demonstrate familiarity with the use of online biotechnology resources.
B. Identify basic modes of Mendelian inheritance in selected species.
C. Demonstrate basic techniques for staining and studying chromosomes.
D. Use appropriate statistical and quantitative techniques such as chi-square
tests in hypothesis testing.
E. Demonstrate principles and proper techniques associated with modern genetic tools such as electrophoresis, and DNA amplification.
F. Critically interpret information obtained using modern genetic techniques.
G. Demonstrate elementary techniques associated with the use of key experimental organisms in modern genetic analysis and biotechnology such as bacteria, yeast and Drosophila.
H. Use appropriate laboratory safety skills and sterile technique.

Modern science is repeatedly uncovering evidence that Darwinian evolution cannot be the explanation for life on earth because it relies on an implausible claim of spontaneous generation, leaves gaps in the fossil record, and is contradicted by emerging scientific discoveries....

Top 10 Most Famous Scientific Theories (That Turned …

The Transcension Hypothesis, John M. Smart, 2011

Hoyle and his associates knew that the smallest conceivable free-living life form needed at least 2,000 independent functional proteins in order to accomplish cellular metabolism and reproduction. Starting with the hypothetical primordial soup he calculated the probability of the spontaneous generation of just the proteins of a single amoebae. He determined that the probability of such an event is one chance in ten to the 40 thousandth power, i.e., 1 in 1040,000. Prior to this project, Hoyle was a believer in the spontaneous generation of life. This project, however, changed his opinion 180 degrees. Hoyle stated: "The likelihood of the formation of life from inanimate matter is one to a number with 40 thousand naughts [zeros] after it. It is enough to bury Darwin and the whole theory of evolution. There was no primeval soup, neither on this planet nor on any other, and if the beginnings of life were not random they must therefore have been the product of purposeful intelligence." Hoyle also concluded that the probability of the spontaneous generation of a single bacteria, "is about the same as the probability that a tornado sweeping through a junk yard could assemble a 747 from the contents therein."

Regarding the probability of spontaneous generation, Harvard University biochemist and Nobel Laureate, George Wald stated: "One has to only contemplate the magnitude of this task to concede that the spontaneous generation of a living organism is impossible. Yet we are here–as a result, I believe, of spontaneous generation." In this incredibly twisted statement, we see that Wald’s dogmatic adherence to the evolutionist’s paradigm is independent of the evidence. Wald’s belief in the "impossible" can only be explained by faith: " the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

Biology (BIOL) < Johnson County Community College

By the end of the nineteenth century, the majority of scientists believed that spontaneous generation was not possible. Loyal Darwinists, however, insisted on spontaneous generation, recognizing that it was the foundation upon which evolutionary theory rests. Ernst Haeckel, one of the chief proponents of Darwinism, stated in 1876: "If we do not accept the hypothesis of spontaneous generation, then at this one point in the history of evolution we must have recourse to the miracle of a supernatural creation."

Taking the results of the present study together with previous embryological research, and assuming that the physiological function of murine PV cardiomyocyte coverage has been lost in other mammals like humans, we propose that in man PV cardiomyocytes may represent a relict of PV embryogenesis, constituting a source of ectopic generation of independent re-entrant wavelets in a subset of patients with a genetic predisposition. This annotation might be a substantial working hypothesis for further experimental investigations in other mammals like guinea pigs in which cardiomyocytes only extend to the hilus [] and spontaneous electrical activity has been observed.

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Dr. Ian Stevenson's Reincarnation Research - The Afterlife


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